Sazerac

I was discussing all things swell with a friend recently. He began to tell me a story of his quest for the best Sazerac he could find. He chose the right place to look for this historic drink, New Orleans. In his words: I have recently gotten hooked on a new cocktail, I made it my mission to find the best Sazerac in New Orleans. I took my mission so seriously that I do not remember much of the details, but I do know that if you’re looking to lose yourself in the Crescent City, the best way to do so is to start the night with a Sazerac. I highly suggest you pick up a bottle of rye, some Peychaud bitters, and a bottle of Herbsaint. You won’t regret it. Continue reading

The Martini

Shaken, not stirred.

Every man worth his salt knows this line and who to attribute it to. In honor of his upcoming movie I thought we should talk about Bond’s drink of choice, the Martini (as you may already know I have a fascination with all things Bond).

The Martini is traditionally a gin cocktail flavored with vermouth, and occasionally garnished with an olive or a lemon twist. Since its inception, the Martini has become one of the most commonly known mixed beverages. If you prefer cocktail onion instead of an olive in your Martini, you would order a Gibson. Others skip the gin all together and opt for vodka instead, thus creating the Vodka Martini. The Martini has been called”the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet “and “the elixir of quietude”. Winston Churchill was said to whisper the word ‘Vermouth’ to a freshly poured glass of gin. Dorothy Parker expressed her opinion: “I like to have a martini/two at the very most. /Three, I’m under the table. /Four, I’m under my host”.

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The Gin and Tonic

  • The Tonic:

Tonic water’s history dates back to 1638, when Spanish soldiers seeking a cure for malaria sought out local Inca Indian medicine men for an antidote. The Inca had long used ground bark of the native Quinquina tree, which grew on the slopes of the Andes Mountains, for a number of illnesses. This bark mixed in a “powerful potion” worked well for these soldiers’ ailments. The ground bark, called Quinine, soon made its way around the world. It became a very valuable malaria medicine reaching costs of its weight in gold. Mixed with soda water, another popular cure al, it became the ever-present Tonic.

The miracle cure was hocked at every corner drug store, and traveling salesman’s suitcase. Scientists soon discovered a way to produce a synthetic substitute of quinine and corporations began producing tonic water with this cheaper, artificial quinine. I have discovered a new tonic called Q Tonic, and it is my preferred tonic for this cocktail.  Q Tonic uses natural ingredients such as agave as a sweetener instead of Cain or corn sugar, and handpicked Peruvian quinine. It is healthier, better tasting, and Continue reading